Using Enum in PHP

An enum, or enumeration, is a data type that consists of a set of named values. In PHP, enums allow you to create a fixed set of constants representing a specific data type.

The primary purpose of enums in PHP is to provide a convenient way to define a set of related constants representing a specific data type. This can be useful in various situations, such as when working with a set of predefined values (such as a set of colours or a set of status codes) or when you want to enforce a particular data type on a variable.

Enums can also make your code more readable and maintainable by giving names to specific values. This can help reduce the use of “magic numbers” in your code, making it challenging to understand what a particular value represents.

Here are some instructions on how to use enums in PHP:

First, define an enum by using the enum keyword followed by the name of the enum. For example:

enum Colors {
    RED,
    GREEN,
    BLUE
}

To access the values in an enum, use the :: operator. For example, to access the RED value in the Colors enum defined above, you would use Colors::RED.

You can also use the get_defined_constants() function to get an array of all the constants defined in an enum. For example:

$colors = get_defined_constants(true)['Colors'];

You can also use the get_class_constants() function to get an array of all the constants defined in an enum, along with their values. For example:

$colors = get_class_constants('Colors');

To check if a given value is part of an enum, use the in_enum() function. For example:

in_enum('Colors', 'GREEN'); // returns true
in_enum('Colors', 'PURPLE'); // returns false

Overall, enums in PHP provide a way to create a fixed set of constants that represent a specific data type. This can help improve the readability and maintainability of your code.

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